Jump to content


Photo

What Are The Best Free HD Video Editing Softwares Out There?


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1    

   

  • Member
  • 43,917 posts

Posted January 11, 2014 - 10:25 PM

What are the best free HD video editing softwares out there?

 

I unfortunately lost the original software disc that came with my camcorder and am looking for an alternative, at the least temporarily. I already tried downloading my camcorder's software through other ways, but kept failing so I've put that option to the side for now.


Edited by    , January 11, 2014 - 10:41 PM.

yo.


#2 -Wade-

-Wade-

    知己知彼,百戰不殆

  • Moderator
  • 6,475 posts
  • Name:Wade
  • Fav. Laker:♛ Kobe Bryant

Posted January 11, 2014 - 10:36 PM

http://www.lwks.com/...d=45&Itemid=184

 

Otherwise, I would snatch up the Sony Vegas demo and then just keep restarting the trial period over and over.


LeGj1r3.png

"I'm always a firm believer in us being able to make our own decisions." --Kobe Bryant

Q: When you take off your jersey for the final time, what will you leave behind on the court?
A: "My heart and soul." --Kobe Bryant


#3 LakeShow1o1

LakeShow1o1

    Superstar

  • Member
  • 7,246 posts
  • Name:The Black Mamba Will Rise
  • Fan Since:1996
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bean Bryant

Posted January 12, 2014 - 12:55 AM

http://www.lwks.com/...d=45&Itemid=184

 

Otherwise, I would snatch up the Sony Vegas demo and then just keep restarting the trial period over and over.

 

Sony Vegas is awesome.

I'd just torrent the most seeded version on piratebay


  • -Wade- likes this

#4 ツ  

ツ  

    All-Star

  • Member
  • 6,177 posts
  • Location:California
  • Fan Since:2003
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted January 12, 2014 - 02:18 AM

well you can get any software free with torrents.

 

but camtasia studio isn't bad for basic editing.


9QBrl.gif


#5    

   

  • Member
  • 43,917 posts

Posted January 12, 2014 - 02:28 AM

^ It looks good, except that I see it does only 30fps max.

 

I want programs that can do 60fps or 59 to be more exact. I want to lose as little quality as possible when converting my 1080p 59fps Panasonic AVCHD videos into a format suitable for DVD-R burning.


yo.


#6    

   

  • Member
  • 43,917 posts

Posted January 12, 2014 - 04:16 PM

So many programs out there downgrade on the conversion the 60fps into 30fps. I need & want to find programs that don't do that and keep the full frames per second for the DVD-R, or is this not even possible?

http://www.lwks.com/...d=45&Itemid=184

 

Otherwise, I would snatch up the Sony Vegas demo and then just keep restarting the trial period over and over.

Do you know if lightworks or Sony Vegas can convert 1080p 60fps AVCHD into a suitable format for DVD-R, probably MP4 or MPEG2, BUT STILL KEEP AS HIGH A QUALITY AS POSSIBLE? In other words, still keep the 60fps and 1920 by 1080, not really downgrade much?


yo.


#7 AnnoyingCustomer

AnnoyingCustomer

    Meh...

  • Member
  • 2,841 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Fan Since:Birth
  • Fav. Laker:Magic Kobe Fish Fox Horry

Posted January 12, 2014 - 04:27 PM

So many programs out there downgrade on the conversion the 60fps into 30fps. I need & want to find programs that don't do that and keep the full frames per second for the DVD-R, or is this not even possible?

Do you know if lightworks or Sony Vegas can convert 1080p 60fps AVCHD into a suitable format for DVD-R, probably MP4 or MPEG2, BUT STILL KEEP AS HIGH A QUALITY AS POSSIBLE? In other words, still keep the 60fps and 1920 by 1080, not really downgrade much?

 

If you convert your file from AVCHD to Mpeg-4 or Mpeg-2 there is going to be a loss of quality no matter what.  Probably less so with Mpeg-4 but definitely with the Mpeg-2...


2zi2dsm.jpg

"I don't want to be remembered, I want to be forgotten..."

           -George Costanza, Seinfeld


#8    

   

  • Member
  • 43,917 posts

Posted January 12, 2014 - 04:36 PM

So I've been doing further research and maybe I'm wrong or right, but hopefully some of you can tell me.. it appears there's only so far a DVD-R can go, what I may have to look at is a BD-R. Is that so?

 

Obviously a BD-R would hold a tone more storage, but I would also think it can hold a higher quality naturally, so for instance, if I used a BD-R video making/burning software, would the conversion for the appropriate format for that downgrade a lot less than that of compatible conversion necessary for DVD-R?

 

Is that maybe what I should consider looking at now instead if my goal is about losing as little original quality as possible? Does anyone know if the BD-R way will also easily allow to keep all original 60fps on the conversion?


yo.


#9 AnnoyingCustomer

AnnoyingCustomer

    Meh...

  • Member
  • 2,841 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Fan Since:Birth
  • Fav. Laker:Magic Kobe Fish Fox Horry

Posted January 12, 2014 - 05:48 PM

I don't know much about the actual burning of a Blu-Ray (I work at a post production facility that does this but its not in my department), but I am almost positive that you could burn your AVC HD file (which is H.264 codec) straight to the Blu-Ray itself...no need to convert to another codec and therefore no loss of the original quality of the file...


  •     likes this

2zi2dsm.jpg

"I don't want to be remembered, I want to be forgotten..."

           -George Costanza, Seinfeld


#10 -Wade-

-Wade-

    知己知彼,百戰不殆

  • Moderator
  • 6,475 posts
  • Name:Wade
  • Fav. Laker:♛ Kobe Bryant

Posted January 13, 2014 - 04:21 PM

So I've been doing further research and maybe I'm wrong or right, but hopefully some of you can tell me.. it appears there's only so far a DVD-R can go, what I may have to look at is a BD-R. Is that so?

 

If you are looking to burn HD content to discs, then yes. DVDs support 480p, the types of discs for HD are HD-DVD and Blu-Ray. BR beat out HD-DVD and is superior to it for the following reasons:

  • Blu-Ray single layer has 2x more capacity than HD-DVD; Blu-Ray dual layer has 4x more capacity than HD-DVD
  • Blu-Ray has faster maximum bitrates, in terms of raw data transfer, audio, and video
  • Blu-Ray supports MPEG-2, H.264 (MPEG-4 AVC) and VC-1 encoding as mandatory

Blu-Ray supports up to 1080p. This is different from 1080i, which is interlaced (two passes interlaced), while 1080p is progressively scanned. Progressive scans are superior to interlaced ones for action scenes, the motion is too fast.

 

So, if you try to burn some .h264 encoded video (also known as MPEG-4 HD AVC) to a DVD, it will actually be an MPEG-2 on the disc. The difference between DVD and Blu-Ray are with what type of laser is used to burn the information, what codecs are supported, and how the information is stored on the disc. Remember, it is all 1s and 0s (bits (now think of the term "bit rate")), and for there to be "true HD," there simply needs to be more "information." DVD will not be able to supply this to you.

 

So when you burn a DVD or are converting to a format for DVD, go for MPEG-2 with the largest bit rate available. I still use DVDs myself but am moving into Blu-Ray. BR makes some films come to life moreso than DVD, depending on your sound system and visual setup.

 

Summary:

  • DVD supports up to 480p
  • Blu-Ray supports up to 1080p
  • 1080p is not the same as 1080i -- 1080p is deemed by most as true HD
  • VHS was mainstream and DVD was a luxury, then DVD was mainstream and Blu-Ray was luxury, now Blu-Ray is considered mainstream and 4K is luxury

Edited by -Wade-, January 13, 2014 - 04:26 PM.

  •     likes this

LeGj1r3.png

"I'm always a firm believer in us being able to make our own decisions." --Kobe Bryant

Q: When you take off your jersey for the final time, what will you leave behind on the court?
A: "My heart and soul." --Kobe Bryant


#11    

   

  • Member
  • 43,917 posts

Posted January 13, 2014 - 05:09 PM

^ Thanks. Although a good portion of your post was information I already did know, there was still some in there I did not know & thus you taught me a few things. Thanks again, appreciate it.

 

By the way, you said go for MPEG-2 when converting to DVD with the largest bit rate available. I was before this under the impression that MP4 was the best quality possible for DVD. Guess I was wrong on that.

 

Also, I'd assume or imagine that on most, if not all, blu-ray players, when playing a dvd on it, the resolution or overall picture quality is somewhat upscaled & enhanced. Yes or no? Specifically, would this occur on a PS3, that you know of?


yo.


#12 -Wade-

-Wade-

    知己知彼,百戰不殆

  • Moderator
  • 6,475 posts
  • Name:Wade
  • Fav. Laker:♛ Kobe Bryant

Posted January 13, 2014 - 06:02 PM

You can save an HD mp4 format to a DVD with all of the nice settings, but most of that information is going to get lost when you burn the file to the DVD, which is why you may as well burn the DVD as mpeg-2 max bitrate.

 

Yes, a blu-ray player, like a PS3, will be able to upscale a DVD all the way up to 1080-i (but not 1080-p). Here is how I treat my videos:

 

DVD: MPEG-2 480p max bitrate

BluRay: .h264 1080p

Digital (film stored on computers, tablets, media servers): .h264 720p


Edited by -Wade-, January 13, 2014 - 06:07 PM.

  •     likes this

LeGj1r3.png

"I'm always a firm believer in us being able to make our own decisions." --Kobe Bryant

Q: When you take off your jersey for the final time, what will you leave behind on the court?
A: "My heart and soul." --Kobe Bryant


#13 AnnoyingCustomer

AnnoyingCustomer

    Meh...

  • Member
  • 2,841 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Fan Since:Birth
  • Fav. Laker:Magic Kobe Fish Fox Horry

Posted January 13, 2014 - 11:03 PM

FYI - 480p isn't HD...


2zi2dsm.jpg

"I don't want to be remembered, I want to be forgotten..."

           -George Costanza, Seinfeld


#14    

   

  • Member
  • 43,917 posts

Posted January 13, 2014 - 11:09 PM

^ Lol.. don't insult my intelligence bruh. :laughing:

 

But seriously though, yeah... but at the least the upscaling helps a little..


yo.


#15 AnnoyingCustomer

AnnoyingCustomer

    Meh...

  • Member
  • 2,841 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Fan Since:Birth
  • Fav. Laker:Magic Kobe Fish Fox Horry

Posted January 14, 2014 - 01:08 AM

Lol, I was actually referring to Wade's post where he said "DVD supports 480p" in reference to your question about burning HD content onto DVD. 

 

Not sure if he was intending to say that 480p is HD but that's how I read it...


  •     likes this

2zi2dsm.jpg

"I don't want to be remembered, I want to be forgotten..."

           -George Costanza, Seinfeld





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users