Art Rogers | LA Times

Now with basketball back in action, Laker Nation has decided to continue to take you back through Laker history to recap important games, record-breaking performances and memorable news from the past 64 years of the franchise.

DECEMBER 7, 1975
WASHINGTON BULLETS 106 – LA LAKERS 114
LAKERS SHOOT 62% FROM THE FIELD AGAINST BULLETS TO CONTINUE UNDEFEATED HOME STREAK

When a road team puts up scoring spurts of 10-0 and 12-2 in only the first quarter against your team, it’s not likely to be a good night. But when you shoot 73% the subsequent quarter and outscore the road team 23-1 before the half, you have more than a good shot to at least make it a game. If your shooting luck continues and you manage to shoot 62% for the entire game, then you’re the Los Angeles Lakers.

Despite dealing with rampant scoring spurts from the visiting Eastern Conference champion Washington Bullets, the Lakers, led by center Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, would go on to secure a 114-106 victory. When Abdul-Jabbar would earn his third foul with a minute still to play in the first quarter, then-Lakers coach Bill Sharman would be forced to sit his star center with the Bullets leading 48-37.

Fearing the Bullets would increase their lead with Abdul-Jabbar out, and also fearing his center would stiffen up, Sharman sent Abdul-Jabbar back into the game early in the second quarter with his three fouls. Sharman’s gamble would pay off, as Abdul-Jabbar would only tally one more foul the rest of the way, but would more importantly score 27 points, grab 17 rebounds, block 6 shots and distribute 6 assists in the win.

Laker guard Gail Goodrich would also narrowly miss a triple-double with 24 points, 10 assists and nine rebounds. The Lakers’ win over the Bullets would be their 12th straight home win, and at 16-8, the Lakers would keep pace with Rick Barry and the Pacific Division-leading Golden State Warriors.

Quote of the Night: “Come to think of it, Kareem wasn’t too bad either.” – Former Laker coach Bill Sharman on his praise for Laker teammates Gail Goodrich, Cazzie Russell and Corky Calhoun. - From the LA Times, Dec. 8, 1975