Andrew Bynum

Pete Newell is arguably one of the greatest ‘big man’ coaches of all time. Good to know he’s taking a liking to Andrew. Lets just hope he’s right.

LA Times: Andrew Bynum will turn 20 in three weeks, a young 7-footer asked to grow up quickly . . . again.

Last season could be described only as an experience, a torrid start dissolving into a frigid ending, complete with a total of two points in the Lakers’ last two playoff games.

In case things couldn’t get worse, the infamous amateur video with Kobe Bryant surfaced midsummer, a reminder that at least one player didn’t think much of the team’s 10th pick in the 2005 draft.

In Bynum’s corner, however, is one of the original big men, proprietor of the internationally known Big Man Camp.

If they’re 7 feet tall and claim to have even a dollop of basketball ability, Pete Newell has seen them over the last 30 years — from Bill Walton to Hakeem Olajuwon to Shaquille O’Neal. Now 92, Newell has taken a keen interest in Bynum, who has attended two of his camps.

Newell saw what any Lakers fan saw of Bynum last season — strong beginning, horrific finale — with further detailed observations from his trained eye.

Continue reading ‘Newell likes what he sees in Bynum’

  • Lakers305

    Holy Shhh…..t, Finally somebody is speaking out and we get a better view on how Kobe is as a teammate. Can we say Jordan?? JOrdan was reputable in calling “Kerr” a f***ot, he even punched his teammates.

    I just think this is ironic, the same shit Shaq used to do to Kobe is the same shit that Kobe is doing to bynum. I thought Kobe of all people could relate to Andrew.

  • http://hzmdesigns.com hZm

    [quote comment="14180"]Holy Shhh…..t, Finally somebody is speaking out and we get a better view on how Kobe is as a teammate. Can we say Jordan?? JOrdan was reputable in calling “Kerr” a f***ot, he even punched his teammates.

    I just think this is ironic, the same shit Shaq used to do to Kobe is the same shit that Kobe is doing to bynum. I thought Kobe of all people could relate to Andrew.[/quote]

    In the circle… the circle of Laker life.

  • kyler_hay

    this guy is freaking 92 yrs old r u sure he knows wat hes talking bout haha jk BYnum will b good

  • foxxy

    SO WHAT KOBE GOT ON HIS CASE…HE’S BEEN IN THE GAME A LONG TIME NOW…AND HE’S A PERFECTIONIST!!!! I AINT MAD AT YOU KOBE!!!! YOU AINT GOTTA BE SOFT WITH THESE PLAYERS…NO ONE WAS SOFT WITH YOU.THIS MAY BE WHY YOU ARE AT THE TOP OF YOUR GAME!!!! KOBE WAS KID ON A TEAM WITH MOSTLY VETERANS (WHEN DRAFTED)AND NO ONE CUT HIM ANY SLACK…STOP YOUR WHINNING BYNUM AND PLAY BALL!

  • fatty

    How does an article about Bynum become an article about Kobe?

    Oh, its from the LATimes, that explains it.

    I’m glad Newell has an interest Bynum. So let me get this straight. Pete says Kobe is the reason why Bynum’s development has been slowed, because of his negative discouraging talk. But when Jackson say’s he is lazy, doesn’t take it seriously, and bench’s Bynum that’s OK.

    Kobe is just doing his job as a vet should. A little tough love will not kill the kid. In fact, in the long run will actually help Bynum grow as an individual. “Spare the rod and spoil the child” is what I say. A firm “Where is your head” reminder is necessary for kidlike players development like Bynum.

    And Laker305, Kobe is no where near Jordan in discipline yet, as Steve Kerr reminded us. Jordan truly humiliated his players by slapping them in the face.

    Further Pete Newell: What is Kobe supposed to do in the heat of battle with the 24 second clock winding down? Say something like “Excuse me Andrew, Could we talk for a moment? Why, you have great potential as a player and a human being. I know this is all new to you, but could you stand right there? I know we’ve practiced this play like maybe 719 times already, and we are trying to make the playoffs and all, and I know you are dreaming of the IHOP pancake special this moment, but this could really, really, really, help the team out if you came to play. I’m sorry to be so harsh to you. I hope I haven’t hurt your feelings” And Bynum responding, “That’s very nice of you Kobe. But while you were talking to me, the other team just scored 23 points and won the game. Perhaps next time. maybe you could just yell at me, or point, or if I still don’t get the point, just grab me and make me go where the coach wants me to be” And Kobe coming back, “Andrew, the game, the playoffs are not important. Its you growing as a young man. That’s what is truly important to me, the Lakers, and the Fans.”

    What does Newell want, PJ and Kobe leading the Lakers in group hugs?

  • daboss1848

    You have to understand that Newell is old school – very much in the mold of John Wooden – who believes in positive reinforcement and division of roles (i.e., coaches are coaches and players are players). He is not a Bob Knight type who believes in instilling fear in a player in order to achieve success.

    There are two schools of thought here ((negative and positive reinforcement) and it’s well known that players respond differently. That is the role of the coach to figure how to motivate each player. The way PJ treated Shaq vs. KB was a classic example of using soft gloves vs. in your face public criticism.

    To say that MJ treated his teammates poorly is a cop out – don’t point to bad behavior to justify other bad behavior. Besides, MJ had a different relationship with his teammates in that they spent time together – whether it be at nudie bars or gambling. An established relationship or friendship creates an atmosphere and comfort for criticism.

  • MacBSlick

    LMAO
    Thank You Fatty. You and I think to much a like.

    “How does an article about Bynum become an article about Kobe?

    Oh, its from the LATimes, that explains it.”

    “and I know you are dreaming of the IHOP pancake special this moment, but this could really, really, really, help the team out if you came to play.”

    “What does Newell want, PJ and Kobe leading the Lakers in group hugs?”

    To Funny and very very honest.

    Didnt Bynum use some harsh words when screaming at Sasha to give him the f-ing ball?

    LA Times is the frickin worse Sports source on the Lakers on the planet.
    I really really have a lot of hate for these journalists. Not one of them can write a piece without ripping Kobe. Its terrible

  • fatty

    Daboss,

    Likening to Kobe being firm in the heat of the battle and to MJ’s slapping his players in the face in practice, is not the same as my respected blogger Laker305 intimated. As Kerr said, it was not an enjoyable experience for him, nor for onlookers. Being verbally abusive is bad(which I don’t even think Kobe was), but slapping someone in the face is crossing all lines of civility.

    Kobe was not even being negative. He was just doing his job as a vet and floor leader does in the triangle should be doing. I’ve also seen this same Kobe praising players for good plays countless times, which is a fine way to reinforce positive development. One of the best forms of counsel is encouragement, but discipline is necessary sometimes, especially in the heat of a competitive moment.

    Generalizing, that Kobe is a negative influence because of a few isolated minor instances, is an unfair characterization.

  • daboss1848

    Fatty, I understand what you were intimating within your sarcastic diatribe and agree for the most part. The LA Times is the LA Times whether it be the sports section or local or world news – it is more opinion pieces than it is journalism.

    My point was merely to give the background within which a 92 year old Pete Newell would be offering his opinions. The author’s “Kobe’s fault” spin is one-sided and unbalanced in its selection of quotes and filler words. A simple balanced explanation or set of examples where Bynum is congratulated or praised by KB would have been appropriate in a journalistic piece – but this is not that piece.

  • fatty

    Daboss,

    Pete Newell is always in teaching mode and my guess, is he probably really meant nothing by it. Part of what he said may have struck a chord with the writer, who then decided to magnify the quote for us.

    The point is interesting, do you handle Bynum differently because of his youthful inexperience? As good as a coach PJ is, he hasn’t had much experience developing new rookies to the NBA. On the other hand, either has Kobe. For Kobe the perfectionist, it must be frustrating dealing with others who don’t take their roles on the team as seriously as him.

    No matter what, its good to hear someone with Newell’s experience say he actually likes this kid.

    I can’t wait till Tuesday to see for myself how Bynum and Co. are progressing.

  • two0one7

    Nice job, Fatty. Couldn’t have said it better myself.

  • kb24 4life

    although the experts and coaches say that this will be bynum’s break out year
    i think that mihm should be in the starting 5

  • ab4sure

    Newell saw what any Lakers fan saw of Bynum last season — strong beginning, horrific finale — with further detailed observations from his trained eye.

    “I was surprised that he played as well as he did at the start of the year,” Newell said. “I think that he was a little confused at the end because he was catching a little hell from Kobe. He was grabbing him by the shirt and telling him what he should and shouldn’t have done. That wouldn’t help anybody, let alone a young player.

    “If [Bynum] does stay with the Lakers, and they don’t trade him, they’ve got to make it clear to Kobe that he’s not the coach and he should be positive, not negative, when he makes the mistakes that he made. I don’t think he’s going to prosper if the older players start to get on him in the court in front of all the people, and that is what happened.”

    There is nothing more embarassing than being yelled out by another player in front of the fans. There is also a BIG DIFFERENCE between being yelled at by the coach and another player. PJ’s correction is more easier to accept. I don’t think other lakers have bought into Kobe “leadership” yet and definitely not like MJ. MJ had the respect by his players where he could correct them on the court. Kobe has yet to earn that, but he still can. Being a great player doesn’t mean your a great leader.

    This old guy in this article knows more basketball than all of us on this site combined and especially about big men. I think we should not dismiss his opinion.

  • fatty

    Hey AB4sure,

    Did you read the Critt article on how he looks to the vets for guidance on the floor. Specifically Kobe helping him on D. That’s part of the learning process, vets helping youngins on and off the court. I would, and many other PRO coaches would disagree with Newell’s advice. Many coaches love to have what they call ‘Floor Generals’, an extention of them on the court. Kobe with his ten NBA years qualifies him as a vet. If a player disregards what a vet would have to say, he wouldn’t be much of a student of the game, would he?

    Kobe playing for 10 plus years, over a 1000 games, 3 titles, dozens of playoff games, all at allstar caliber, does earn him respect from
    his peers. Team USA players, hung with Kobe to learn from him, and they were considered the best. A few Laker rookies would similarly learn from listening.

    Amidst all these games and only 3-4 questionable outbursts from Kobe? And even those are debatable as to what really happened, does not a reputation make. I have seen Kobe on many occasion commending his guys when they play good. Now, slapping your teammates like MJ, did not earn their respect. If you think it does, try slapping your wife and then asking her if she respects you more. The last I heard of employers doing it, we called them ‘masters’ and they were slapping their slaves. It didn’t go over well then, and doesn’t go over well now.

  • TheLAunit

    I can’t wait to see bynum prove everybody wrong this year. I’m ready for the season to start already…..GO LAKERS!!!!

  • ab4sure

    There is a big difference in learning from someone and following them as a leader. My teacher might teach me things about a subject, he might have gotten awards and been recognized for his accomplishments, he could have taught for 30 years, but I still might not respect him for his leadership abilities and the way he handles his students. Critt’s no dummy, he is going to learn all he can from Kobe. The players respect kobe for his accomplishments, but Kobe has not yet garnered their respect as a leader. Like I said earlier, he still has the oppotunity.

    As far as MJ’s tactics, I tried to learn more about the situation, but only found a few regular guys like ourselves mention the incident in passing on a thread. If you have a link or something I would like to read about it. What I do know is that MJ did garner the respect of his appears not only for his ability, but as a leader of the team.

    When I think of a floor general” I think of teams that control the game on the court, like a Kidd, Parker, pointguards for the most part. Your best player doesn’t necessarily have to be the “floor general” Neither MJ or Kobe were clear floor generals and that in part is due to the triangle offensive system. It really is a sharing of the ball type of system and no one guy controls the ball like a Kidd.

    What PJ said a few weeks ago was that the Lakers lacked stability and when he thought of D. Fish he thought that Fish represents stability. I think Fish is going to make a huge difference not only on bringing stability to the floor, but off the court as well.

  • fatty

    AB4sure,

    Kerr said it on a TV broadcast and was followed up by studio discussions. Kerr was very strong that MJ’s teammates didn’t respect him for that. The studio people that night, concurred that MJ did slap his teammates. It was no secret among NBA players. But MJ led by example on the court and his work ethics, and had the titles to prove it.

    The ‘floor general’ was in answer to the comment that players were not supposed to be coaches on the floor and telling others what to do. (Pete Newell)Kobe is not a ‘floor general’, but certainly is a ‘floor leader’ which is evidenced by just watching the games.

    Fisher will be the glue on the Lakers this year. Unlike Smush who really did nothing. Kobe, Lamar, and Fish should help the Lakers in leadership a lot this year. I think Fish was an excellent acquisition for at least that reason.

    Its going to be an interesting year for sure watching this team develop. Kobe’s gifts are not in running the team, he is a scorer and part time playmaker. Having Fish and Odom will take some of the burden off of Kobe and let him do what he does best.

    AB4sure, whats your take on Ronny maybe starting at the 4?

  • foxxy

    [quote comment="14184"]How does an article about Bynum become an article about Kobe?

    Oh, its from the LATimes, that explains it.

    I’m glad Newell has an interest Bynum. So let me get this straight. Pete says Kobe is the reason why Bynum’s development has been slowed, because of his negative discouraging talk. But when Jackson say’s he is lazy, doesn’t take it seriously, and bench’s Bynum that’s OK.

    Kobe is just doing his job as a vet should. A little tough love will not kill the kid. In fact, in the long run will actually help Bynum grow as an individual. “Spare the rod and spoil the child” is what I say. A firm “Where is your head” reminder is necessary for kidlike players development like Bynum.

    And Laker305, Kobe is no where near Jordan in discipline yet, as Steve Kerr reminded us. Jordan truly humiliated his players by slapping them in the face.

    Further Pete Newell: What is Kobe supposed to do in the heat of battle with the 24 second clock winding down? Say something like “Excuse me Andrew, Could we talk for a moment? Why, you have great potential as a player and a human being. I know this is all new to you, but could you stand right there? I know we’ve practiced this play like maybe 719 times already, and we are trying to make the playoffs and all, and I know you are dreaming of the IHOP pancake special this moment, but this could really, really, really, help the team out if you came to play. I’m sorry to be so harsh to you. I hope I haven’t hurt your feelings” And Bynum responding, “That’s very nice of you Kobe. But while you were talking to me, the other team just scored 23 points and won the game. Perhaps next time. maybe you could just yell at me, or point, or if I still don’t get the point, just grab me and make me go where the coach wants me to be” And Kobe coming back, “Andrew, the game, the playoffs are not important. Its you growing as a young man. That’s what is truly important to me, the Lakers, and the Fans.”

    What does Newell want, PJ and Kobe leading the Lakers in group hugs?[/quote]
    WELL SAID…WHY DOES KOBE HAVE TO BE SOFT??? THIS IS THE NBA…NO BOYS ALLOWED!!! GET IT TOGETHER ANDREW!!!

  • ab4sure

    So should we expect Kobe to be slapping players in the face next foxxy??? Just because MJ “did it” doesn’t make it effective. I don’t think Steve Kerr would say it was considering that he had some good coaches to play for like Lute Olsen, PJ, and Popovich. Leaders, coaches, don’t have to go Bob Knight on players. There are more effective ways that don’t involve blowing up like a Bob Knight. Nor should you have a tea party and say “andrew, could we talk for a moment”. I didn’t see any of the Laker veterans like Fox, Harper, Shaw or Shaq grab Kobe’s jersey when he threw up three airballs as a rookie in Utah. This was in the playoffs. Well if you are right foxxy then maybe back then Shaq should have said to Kobe “what the hell you doin shootin 3 air balls rookie, we want to win and your throwing up this crap. Straighten up rook or we will ship your ass out!!!!!!” And he should have done it at the first airball. I guarantee you that if Shaq had done that Shaq and Kobe would not have lasted as long as they did.

  • ab4sure

    oh yes and Shaq should have given him two slaps in the face….LOL