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Head Coach Discussion; Current candidates: Mike Dunleavy & Byron Scott


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#3421 Clutch Factor

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Posted Yesterday, 04:45 PM

None of the available coaches directly scream long term success honestly. 

 

Karl prefers a 30-30-30 system. He favors around 30 layups, 30 free throws, and 30 assists each game. The system emphasizes constant ball movement and spacing without a select player holding the ball for too long or shooting 15-20 foot jump shots. However, that style often struggles in the slower-paced Playoffs, especially against teams playing zone or against teams with strong interior defense. The "others" struggle, and the players that have to take over in those moments are offensively-elite talent like Melo or Kobe. 

 

In terms of defense, Karl's never been a strict tactician of it. He does emphasize it during practices, which usually consist of 60% defense and 40% offense. However, his teams have usually been average to bottom half in defense. So when your offense is negated in the Playoffs and your defense wasn't your strongest suit to begin with, his teams are going to struggle in the Playoffs. The question is...can he properly adjust? Out of the 22 times he has made the Playoffs, 14 of those have been first round exits.

 

Lastly, in times of team struggles, Karl has been known to exhibit negative body language. During the games, he'll just sink his head into his hands, slouch down, walk slower than usual without enthusiasm during timeouts, et cetera. During postgame interviews, he'll constantly show frustration and often mutter not the best remarks. 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Scott primarily relies on the Princeton Offense, which emphasizes constant motion, passing, cuts, teamwork, and a relatively high basketball IQ. It's a tough offense to guard, but at the same time, it's difficult to learn and constantly stay focused each play. Scott has always valued defense and rebounding, and the Nets team he coached to the Finals were top 5 in defense. His New Orleans teams ranked anywhere from 6th to upper half in terms of defense. It's important to note that he's been successful defensively when given a strong perimeter (Kidd/CP3) and interior (Martin/Chandler) defender. 

 

Scott can often let his ego get in the way and refuse to change his system or philosophy. When his Nets team was getting hurt inside during the Finals by the talents of Shaq and Duncan, he constantly refused to throw double-teams. He's often placed key players on the bench for too long without effectively communicating with that player over why he was benched. 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Whoever is ultimately hired, I can see various complaints during the season and/or Playoffs. Whether it be Karl's Playoff struggles or Scott's ego and hence inability to properly adjust. I still wonder why we didn't hire Phil...Or at least Brian Shaw who could continue coaching the Triangle system and seek assistance with Phil. Well, I hope the Lakers FO is thinking long and hard this time.



#3422 David

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Posted Yesterday, 04:59 PM

If you want Doc, you have to "trade" for him.

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#3423 Majesty

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Posted Yesterday, 06:43 PM

None of the available coaches directly scream long term success honestly. 

 

Karl prefers a 30-30-30 system. He favors around 30 layups, 30 free throws, and 30 assists each game. The system emphasizes constant ball movement and spacing without a select player holding the ball for too long or shooting 15-20 foot jump shots. However, that style often struggles in the slower-paced Playoffs, especially against teams playing zone or against teams with strong interior defense. The "others" struggle, and the players that have to take over in those moments are offensively-elite talent like Melo or Kobe. 

 

In terms of defense, Karl's never been a strict tactician of it. He does emphasize it during practices, which usually consist of 60% defense and 40% offense. However, his teams have usually been average to bottom half in defense. So when your offense is negated in the Playoffs and your defense wasn't your strongest suit to begin with, his teams are going to struggle in the Playoffs. The question is...can he properly adjust? Out of the 22 times he has made the Playoffs, 14 of those have been first round exits.

 

Lastly, in times of team struggles, Karl has been known to exhibit negative body language. During the games, he'll just sink his head into his hands, slouch down, walk slower than usual without enthusiasm during timeouts, et cetera. During postgame interviews, he'll constantly show frustration and often mutter not the best remarks. 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Scott primarily relies on the Princeton Offense, which emphasizes constant motion, passing, cuts, teamwork, and a relatively high basketball IQ. It's a tough offense to guard, but at the same time, it's difficult to learn and constantly stay focused each play. Scott has always valued defense and rebounding, and the Nets team he coached to the Finals were top 5 in defense. His New Orleans teams ranked anywhere from 6th to upper half in terms of defense. It's important to note that he's been successful defensively when given a strong perimeter (Kidd/CP3) and interior (Martin/Chandler) defender. 

 

Scott can often let his ego get in the way and refuse to change his system or philosophy. When his Nets team was getting hurt inside during the Finals by the talents of Shaq and Duncan, he constantly refused to throw double-teams. He's often placed key players on the bench for too long without effectively communicating with that player over why he was benched. 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Whoever is ultimately hired, I can see various complaints during the season and/or Playoffs. Whether it be Karl's Playoff struggles or Scott's ego and hence inability to properly adjust. I still wonder why we didn't hire Phil...Or at least Brian Shaw who could continue coaching the Triangle system and seek assistance with Phil. Well, I hope the Lakers FO is thinking long and hard this time.



One thing about Karl is on a lot of the last playoff runs he's been on.  He's taken a much less talented team and overachieved with them, till ultimately they lost to the more talented team. 

But even the year that he won coach of the year and was fired after winning 50 games, they lost Gallo before they went to the playoffs and that hurt them against Golden State and even then nearly each game was close. 

Can't fault a guy like Karl for being one of the best for making a lot happen with little, eventually in the playoffs is when talent actually catches up to you.   Scott needs superstars at the point on offense and defense for his methods to actually work.   

With Karl you can make it to the playoffs and you may lose against the more talented team, with Scott you may not even make the playoffs.  


So for that reason Karl would be the guy I'd go with.   If the Lakers came out of their worst year ever in franchise history and made the playoffs as a darkhorse, they'd look like a team a piece or two away which makes it more attractive than Scott not leading them to the playoffs away and looking 4-5 years away.


Is Wayne Brady gonna have to Djokovic? - Robert Flores 


#3424 Clutch Factor

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Posted Yesterday, 09:05 PM



One thing about Karl is on a lot of the last playoff runs he's been on.  He's taken a much less talented team and overachieved with them, till ultimately they lost to the more talented team. 

But even the year that he won coach of the year and was fired after winning 50 games, they lost Gallo before they went to the playoffs and that hurt them against Golden State and even then nearly each game was close. 

Can't fault a guy like Karl for being one of the best for making a lot happen with little, eventually in the playoffs is when talent actually catches up to you.   Scott needs superstars at the point on offense and defense for his methods to actually work.   

With Karl you can make it to the playoffs and you may lose against the more talented team, with Scott you may not even make the playoffs.  


So for that reason Karl would be the guy I'd go with.   If the Lakers came out of their worst year ever in franchise history and made the playoffs as a darkhorse, they'd look like a team a piece or two away which makes it more attractive than Scott not leading them to the playoffs away and looking 4-5 years away.

 

I agree, I think it'd be easier making the Playoffs with Karl rather than Scott. The main reason being that if Scott plans to implement the Princeton again, it's going to take time to learn that system. And if losses accumulate quickly during the start of the season, the chances of making the Playoffs in the West will be difficult. 

 

I still don't know if I'd choose Karl though. Running a faster pace may lead to more injuries. Also, expending that much energy on the offensive end often doesn't result in much effort on the defensive end unless you have elite defensive talent. I like Byron Scott's emphasis on defense and rebounding. If the team can successfully master the Princeton, it would be a potent system to defend. But what if the players struggle with the Princeton offense? What if Scott's ego limits the success of the team at a crucial moment? What if our free agents leave due to those factors? 

 

There just isn't a clear-cut answer to either.



#3425 Majesty

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Posted Yesterday, 09:10 PM

Well Karl did slow down his pace when he did get Chauncey Billups and Chauncey had one of his best years there in the twilight of his career.

I always watch how Karl works with players that are older, the way he uses Chauncey Billups, the way he used Andre Miller, Karl is a very very smart coach and he'd understand what Kobe can and can't do.   I honestly think he'd get the most out of our team and wouldn't run Kobe into the ground.  Look at the people older in their age when they played under Karl.  Never got ran into the ground and always were maximized and looked under new legs, cause Karl is smart about how to use them and he wouldn't stubbornly keep them first in pace if he has age on his team.    

I think that's why I think Karl could be more 'trusted' with Kobe if he's the coach.  I think the only time we'd run up tempo is if Kobe isn't on the court and even still he's slowed down the pace for older players before so I think he'd likely do it for Kobe so that's not a worry of mine. 

And Karl is a players coach for veterans and young players alike.  Byron's stubbornness and dictatorship coaching style is why his teams tune him out, because the results stop coming in. 


Is Wayne Brady gonna have to Djokovic? - Robert Flores 





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