Jump to content




Photo

The Kobe Assist


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Tensai

Tensai

    █▄█▄█ █ █▀█

  • 3,281 posts
  • Joined: Sep 19, 2010

Posted December 06, 2012 - 09:51 AM

I have come across this article regarding the opportunity created by "good" shot misses and statistical analysis which arose from Kobe's case - hence the nickname given. It is a very interesting read, albeit long but give it a shot with a cup of coffee or something. I included only a small portion of the article here, the link of the article is right below the quote. Enjoy it.

Missed shots are kind of like informal jump balls that happen dozens of times per game. Instead of a referee gently tossing the ball up in the air, some random ricochet off of the basket breaks the bad news to the offense, propels the ball skyward, and for a few moments the ball is disowned and its possession is literally up for grabs. But just like shot outcomes, rebounding outcomes also depend on who is shooting, where they are shooting from, the stratagems of each team, the rebounding abilities of each player, and the precise spatial configuration of the 10 players on the court; as a result, there is a less apparent tenet of basketball: All missed shots are not created equal, and their DNA is inherently dependent upon their ancestral events — some missed shots are good for the defensive team, and some benefit the offense, as many misses actually extend offensive possessions with the proverbial "fresh 24."

This is where the Kobe Pass — a necessary predecessor to the Kobe Assist — comes into play. I define the Kobe Pass as the missed shot that begets an offensive rebound and thus extends an offensive possession. Of course, offensive rebounds are an important statistic on their own, but sole credit for an offensive rebound is traditionally awarded to the player who acquires the rebound. Little else is considered. We conceptualize them as destinations but ignore their origins. Where do offensive rebounds come from?

Offensive rebounds are constructive offensive events that frequently result in a big basketball player possessing the ball very close to the goal. They are like surreptitious but extremely effective entry passes. In fact, league-wide, 34 percent of the time Kobe passes results in points right away because the recipient of the Kobe Pass, a.k.a. the offensive rebounder, frequently scores immediately after acquiring the basketball. In such cases, I define the Kobe Assist as an achievement credited to a player or a team missing a basket that in a way leads directly to the kind of field goal generally referred to as a put-back, tip-in, or follow.

Many times these field goals shape the outcomes of basketball games, but we neglect to consider what exactly they follow. We fail to explore the interactions between shot events and put-backs. We fail to understand which shooting environments are most or least conducive to offensive rebounds. We only kind of know which players' and teams' missed shots are most likely to result in put-backs. Most important, we have no idea who leads the NBA in Kobe Assists.

Spoiler alert: Kobe Bryant is the king of the Kobe Assist and hence its namesake. Over the last two seasons, Kobe had over 200 Kobe Assists, which is by far the most in the league and also precedes the arrival of Dwight Howard, the most dominant interior presence in the NBA. The combination of one of the league's most voluminous and creative jump shooters with the league's most dominant interior force will only proliferate the Kobe Assist phenomenon in L.A.




Source: http://www.grantland...tic-kobe-assist

Edited by Tensai, December 06, 2012 - 09:56 AM.


#2 Jay Cee

Jay Cee

  • 1,631 posts
  • Joined: Oct 01, 2012
  • Location:San Clemente
  • Name:James
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:The Mamba

Posted December 06, 2012 - 03:50 PM

Just read the full article. Really interesting, I was thinking Kobe has these numbers largely because of Bynum, but then it states James Harden has far fewer Kobe assists with Asik, one of the leading rebounders in the league. Cool article.

#3 gque24

gque24

    Starter

  • 4,371 posts
  • Joined: Sep 03, 2009
  • Location:Sky High
  • Fan Since:1985
  • Fav. Laker:KOBE

Posted December 06, 2012 - 03:59 PM

Like I challeneged 1 of you Kobe haters in here b4 who have issues with him being a facilitator = Count up all teh would be assist off the misses from teh times he passes to his teammates and you will recognize that if they made half of them Kobe would easily average 8 or more assists per gm while still getting 25-30 pts per gm.
Never Wrong Always Right Like Freeway Exits!!

#4 stillshining

stillshining

    Rookie

  • 715 posts
  • Joined: Aug 26, 2012
  • Name:Adam
  • Fan Since:1993
  • Fav. Laker:Slava Medvedenko

Posted December 06, 2012 - 08:57 PM

People forget that there really are few players that get the complete defensive attention Kobe gets even at this age, guys are so concerned about where he is they lose track of their own men. When guys on the Lakers are watching Kobe operate on the offensive end, the defensive guys are probably doing the same thing. Dude had two huge Kobe assists against the suns (game 5) and thunder (game 6) to end games in vital playoff games because guys were too focused on Kobe killing them

#5 Tensai

Tensai

    █▄█▄█ █ █▀█

  • 3,281 posts
  • Joined: Sep 19, 2010

Posted December 06, 2012 - 09:45 PM

I'm willing to bet if Kwame's hands were a bit bigger, Kobe could have averaged 3 more assists and like 5 Kobe Assist a game during his monster run.

#6 Listen2TheBeatt

Listen2TheBeatt

    6th Man

  • 692 posts
  • Joined: Dec 10, 2011
  • Location:Boston, MA
  • Name:Colin
  • Fan Since:1991
  • Fav. Laker:Ariza

Posted December 07, 2012 - 06:52 AM

I was expecting the Kobe assist to be where Kobe sets up a player with a great pass and then they (Gasol) blows the layup or misses the shot. Its almost like it should be an assist, but its not because the recipient sucks. That or when you pass to a player and they miss but get fouled and therefore get two shots. If they make at least one of the free throws, the passer should get an assist IMO
Videographer for LakerNation.com & STNTV
Follow me on Twitter @Listen2TheBeatt

#7 bfc1125roy

bfc1125roy

    Superstar

  • 4,047 posts
  • Joined: Dec 10, 2011
  • Fan Since:2004
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted December 07, 2012 - 08:25 AM

I was expecting the Kobe assist to be where Kobe sets up a player with a great pass and then they (Gasol) blows the layup or misses the shot. Its almost like it should be an assist, but its not because the recipient sucks. That or when you pass to a player and they miss but get fouled and therefore get two shots. If they make at least one of the free throws, the passer should get an assist IMO


This. People used to call him a ball-hog back in the Smush-Kwame days, but they don't realize he actually did defer to them and still shockingly managed to average 4-5 assists per game. And obviously with such a roster I don't blame him for taking matters into his own hands a lot of the time. With a semi-competent roster he would have had at least 6 assists per game, but quite likely a few more. You'd be seeing more of a LeBron type season except better, maybe 30-33 points, 6 rebounds, 8 assists.

#8 DanishLakerFan

DanishLakerFan

    Starter

  • 5,002 posts
  • Joined: May 27, 2011
  • Fan Since:1998
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe

Posted December 07, 2012 - 10:06 AM

This is an article about how a missed shot isn't necessary a bad thing. Calling it a Kobe-assist is not exactly a compliment to Kobe's playmaking abilities, but rather a shot (of sorts) at Kobe for shooting (and missing) a lot of shots. I guess the writer isn't a big Kobe fan.

Another thing. The writer talks about how the Kobe assist is something more than just a miss - how when Kobe misses there is a bigger chance of an offensive rebound, than when a "normal" player shoots. IMO that is typically sportswriter-stats - i.e. nonsense-stats.

Perhaps the increased chance of an offensive rebound when Kobe shoots is because he often occupies two defenders rather than one, which leaves them with one less rebounder. Maybe it would be better to introduce a stat called "demanded double-teams" rather than a Kobe-assist.

Just my opinion...




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users