Jump to content




Photo

Real Hip-Hop? Agree or Disagree.


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 GP1_KB24

GP1_KB24

    Dedication 4.

  • 20,198 posts
  • Joined: Apr 10, 2009
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe & Dwight.

Posted May 13, 2012 - 07:32 PM

What is your stance on "real hiphop" what makes it "real" or not? Is Lil B real hip hop? Or only people like Nas? This is a big term in the hip hop community with a lot of different opinions.... Discuss.


This video makes good points, not saying I agree or disagree though.


Edited by GP1_KB24, May 13, 2012 - 07:35 PM.

5 Letters... 'YMCMB'

Posted Image


#2 -Wade-

-Wade-

    知己知彼,百戰不殆

  • 5,951 posts
  • Joined: Jun 17, 2010
  • Location:◕‿◕
  • Name:Chao ❤
  • Fan Since:▄︻̷̿┻̿═━一
  • Fav. Laker:♛ Kobe Bryant

Posted May 13, 2012 - 07:56 PM

Real hip-hop is the literature plus the culture. You're real if you can spit about real stuff and not just about the same four line cars and ho metaphors, and also be able to deliver different stories and dictions. Using different literary devices and just not the same repetitive bull[expletive]... with autotune added for flavoring to a lack of skill. It is a science, and part of being real in the hip-hop "game" is being an emcee.

The emcee can spit off the dome for real, and can perform dynamic improv anytime anywhere. Just because a rapper drops a "hot track" or album doesn't make it great.. the mainstream is shifting for a [expletive]ty taste of music. I mean it's obviously not [expletive]ty to most, but I am conscious aware and my taste for real talent does not evolve. As such, Lil Wayne and other candy cane rappers nowadays are the rappers that aren't real.

Want real?
Spoiler

wKNsigp.png

"I'm always a firm believer in us being able to make our own decisions." --Kobe Bryant


#3 FLOCKA

FLOCKA

    COOK LIKE KOBE BRYANT

  • 2,739 posts
  • Joined: Apr 04, 2010
  • Fan Since:Nah
  • Fav. Laker:Kobun

Posted May 13, 2012 - 08:21 PM

I feel like the basis of the real hip-hop mentality that all rap music must be lyrically complex with conscious content really boxes the genre in as far as creativity goes. Before you call a rapper like Waka Flocka untalented you have to take into account other factors, such as mic presence and his ability to create such an energetic mood for his music that rappers like J. Cole wouldn't be able to do to save their lives; just as Waka Flocka wouldn't be able to write a song as lyrically proficient as Cole to save his life.

For me music is about creating a certain mood that you can vibe with, if a rapper can do that in a genuine way then that is what I consider "real", regardless of how redundant the lyrical content is. I'm a firm believer in the idea that it takes just as much skill to be able to write catchy songs on a consistent basis as it does to write a lyrically complex song.

Different rappers fill different niches, there's a time for ignorant music and a time for reflective music. What the real hip-hop heads don't understand yet is that rappers like Gucci Mane and Kendrick Lamar make completely different sub-genres of hip-hop. Just like classic rock and heavy metal sound completely different, so as a fan of the genre it's in your best interest to accept the other form and move on.. which isn't that hard to do in this day and age where we have a plethora of different rappers out there on the internet.
R.I.P. Zyzz 1989-2011

#4 Biggums

Biggums

    I Do Work

  • 316 posts
  • Joined: May 18, 2009
  • Location:Say town
  • Fan Since:birth
  • Fav. Laker:kobe / glen rice

Posted May 14, 2012 - 07:12 AM

I feel like the basis of the real hip-hop mentality that all rap music must be lyrically complex with conscious content really boxes the genre in as far as creativity goes. Before you call a rapper like Waka Flocka untalented you have to take into account other factors, such as mic presence and his ability to create such an energetic mood for his music that rappers like J. Cole wouldn't be able to do to save their lives; just as Waka Flocka wouldn't be able to write a song as lyrically proficient as Cole to save his life.

For me music is about creating a certain mood that you can vibe with, if a rapper can do that in a genuine way then that is what I consider "real", regardless of how redundant the lyrical content is. I'm a firm believer in the idea that it takes just as much skill to be able to write catchy songs on a consistent basis as it does to write a lyrically complex song.

Different rappers fill different niches, there's a time for ignorant music and a time for reflective music. What the real hip-hop heads don't understand yet is that rappers like Gucci Mane and Kendrick Lamar make completely different sub-genres of hip-hop. Just like classic rock and heavy metal sound completely different, so as a fan of the genre it's in your best interest to accept the other form and move on.. which isn't that hard to do in this day and age where we have a plethora of different rappers out there on the internet.


cosigned
Posted Image
SPurs Suck

#5 LakersGAFan

LakersGAFan

    The Don, Cappo & Consigliere'

  • 11,493 posts
  • Joined: Mar 17, 2009
  • Location:Tha ATL
  • Name:LT
  • Fan Since:When Magic crossed over the entire Warriors team in like 88. Chis Gatling looked like he was gonna cry.
  • Fav. Laker:KB

Posted May 14, 2012 - 07:52 AM

Great post GP because the term" Keeping it Real" has become hip hops most stretched and misconstrued word.
Being real and the unforeseen street life have blurred peoples perception. You dont have to be a gangster to be real. Just dont act and speak like one when you are not. Someone can be strictly entertainment based and still be 100% real. But you wont read a opinion like this in SOURCE, Vibe, XL or website because their in business to push their propaganda based opinions to make money.

IMO real is the purpose, direction and message of the artist as it relates to their actual lives.


Of course everyone is entitled to their own definitions. But they should have a broader scope to the entire genre as a whole.
For example a fan of someones music deems his songs real because he talks about doing crack and eating bloody vaginas while shooting down cops.
But listens to a Will Smith track about the MIB aliens and belives Will Smith to be "fake".

In actuality if the rapper who does crack and eats bloody punana actually DOES what he talks about, well then hes real. But if hes just making up a story and telling it as its his own....hes as fake as a $3 bill. If hes telling the story from a 3rd person point of view thats ok because hes SHARING REALITY HES ABSORBED in his life. But he must somehow give clarity that its a story about someone else. For example "Brendas Got a Baby but Brenda can barely spell her name".
And because Will Smith is doing a track for entertainment purposes to correlate with his movie, even though we all know its fictional...hes still keeping it "real". Even if he kills and shoots a few aliens in the song like he does in MIB movies. It goes w/o question that hes not a real secret service member with a Tiny Cricket laser gun shooting Aliens into blobs of goo while his Pug gives him clues.

But then theres always instances in a artists past where he/she may be forced to do what they have to not what they want to.

MC Hammer was a pop star, made millions. The fan community views him as being "fake". But he used most of his fortune to give back to the Oakland community where he was from, employ his friends and family and even help past rivals advance in their careers.
Is that fake?
Hammer never rapped about street life unless it was 3rd person story based like "We need to Pray Just to Make it Today".

People believe 2pac is the most real ever.
And not to debate that but there was a time in Pacs life he was a background dancer for Digital Underground. Dancing in the background with a sex blow up doll and all that.

Does that mean hes fake? Not in my opinion. It meant he was doing something he needed to do to advance his career....oh snap...isnt that entertainment based and deemed as fake though?

People always viewed Ma$e as fake.
But why. Because he left his label in the pinnacle of death and street warfare to do Christian Music.
I dont call that fake I call it a career move. Like when Dion Sanders wouldnt make a tackle in the open field :laughing:

But later he came back to Badboy and rapped the line:
"They sayin' Ma$e ain't the same cat. But every time you get robbed I get ya chain back".
And not many know this but when Pac had his Thug Life chain robbed in his 1st shooting in NY (5 shots couldnt drop me I took em and smiled)
A short while later Ma$e bought the chain from whoever and had it mailed to Pacs mom and sent a letter to Pac in Rikers Island. Rumors say it wasnt a peace treaty and it wasnt about saying sorry for what had happened. It was just about trying to make right what somehow went wrong.
And did Pac ever say anything about Ma$e.....nope. He called out Jay Z, Puff, Big, Lil Kim, Ceaser and all the rest. But never Ma$e.
So how is Ma$e fake or a sell out just because he chose a path of non violence and sanctity?

So as long as a rapper doesnt talk about capping peeps in his past, or doing something that didnt actually happen hes real. regardless of his rap music sub genre (pop rap, gangster rap, etc.)

Edited by LakersGAFan, May 14, 2012 - 08:04 AM.

KBdive_zpsa0338da3.jpg


#6 LALakersFan4Life

LALakersFan4Life

    16 Time NBA Champions Los Angeles Lakers!

  • 10,643 posts
  • Joined: Jul 29, 2008
  • Location:Covina, CA
  • Fan Since:1989
  • Fav. Laker:Magic, Kobe and Ron Artest

Posted August 29, 2013 - 03:28 PM

Great post GP because the term" Keeping it Real" has become hip hops most stretched and misconstrued word.
Being real and the unforeseen street life have blurred peoples perception. You dont have to be a gangster to be real. Just dont act and speak like one when you are not. Someone can be strictly entertainment based and still be 100% real. But you wont read a opinion like this in SOURCE, Vibe, XL or website because their in business to push their propaganda based opinions to make money.

IMO real is the purpose, direction and message of the artist as it relates to their actual lives.

Of course everyone is entitled to their own definitions. But they should have a broader scope to the entire genre as a whole.
For example a fan of someones music deems his songs real because he talks about doing crack and eating bloody vaginas while shooting down cops.
But listens to a Will Smith track about the MIB aliens and belives Will Smith to be "fake".

In actuality if the rapper who does crack and eats bloody punana actually DOES what he talks about, well then hes real. But if hes just making up a story and telling it as its his own....hes as fake as a $3 bill. If hes telling the story from a 3rd person point of view thats ok because hes SHARING REALITY HES ABSORBED in his life. But he must somehow give clarity that its a story about someone else. For example "Brendas Got a Baby but Brenda can barely spell her name".
And because Will Smith is doing a track for entertainment purposes to correlate with his movie, even though we all know its fictional...hes still keeping it "real". Even if he kills and shoots a few aliens in the song like he does in MIB movies. It goes w/o question that hes not a real secret service member with a Tiny Cricket laser gun shooting Aliens into blobs of goo while his Pug gives him clues.

But then theres always instances in a artists past where he/she may be forced to do what they have to not what they want to.

MC Hammer was a pop star, made millions. The fan community views him as being "fake". But he used most of his fortune to give back to the Oakland community where he was from, employ his friends and family and even help past rivals advance in their careers.
Is that fake?
Hammer never rapped about street life unless it was 3rd person story based like "We need to Pray Just to Make it Today".

People believe 2pac is the most real ever.
And not to debate that but there was a time in Pacs life he was a background dancer for Digital Underground. Dancing in the background with a sex blow up doll and all that.

Does that mean hes fake? Not in my opinion. It meant he was doing something he needed to do to advance his career....oh snap...isnt that entertainment based and deemed as fake though?

People always viewed Ma$e as fake.
But why. Because he left his label in the pinnacle of death and street warfare to do Christian Music.
I dont call that fake I call it a career move. Like when Dion Sanders wouldnt make a tackle in the open field :laughing:

But later he came back to Badboy and rapped the line:
"They sayin' Ma$e ain't the same cat. But every time you get robbed I get ya chain back".
And not many know this but when Pac had his Thug Life chain robbed in his 1st shooting in NY (5 shots couldnt drop me I took em and smiled)
A short while later Ma$e bought the chain from whoever and had it mailed to Pacs mom and sent a letter to Pac in Rikers Island. Rumors say it wasnt a peace treaty and it wasnt about saying sorry for what had happened. It was just about trying to make right what somehow went wrong.
And did Pac ever say anything about Ma$e.....nope. He called out Jay Z, Puff, Big, Lil Kim, Ceaser and all the rest. But never Ma$e.
So how is Ma$e fake or a sell out just because he chose a path of non violence and sanctity?


So as long as a rapper doesnt talk about capping peeps in his past, or doing something that didnt actually happen hes real. regardless of his rap music sub genre (pop rap, gangster rap, etc.)

Where'd u hear that Pac and Mase story from?



#7 Ham

Ham

    Rap Enthusiast

  • 6,552 posts
  • Joined: Jul 10, 2012
  • Fan Since:Showtime
  • Fav. Laker:Magic Johnson, Kobe Bryant

Posted August 29, 2013 - 08:51 PM

Real Hip Hop comes from those who write for an actual purpose. They focus on there conviction and that purpose is what separates real rappers from rappers looking for fame and money. Many rappers don't know there true purpose of rapping. They're still searching for it. Many just want the bling. Especially the new ones. When you hear a rapper spit "real" [expletive] it's usually about life, love, etc. Real rap is like poetry. That's how rap started off. Real rappers share there experiences, there OWN realities of this world. That's the beauty of hip hop. The ability to relate to others experiences through a play with words and rhyming. When I listened to people like Nas, Pac, Rakim, I feel them. It's as if a bunch of words put together knows exactly how I feel. I can relate to what they spit.

I'm very adamant about the direction of hip hop going a wrong direction with all these mainstream rappers. They're ruining the beauty of it. The closest thing that's currently bringing back the old ways of hip hop are people like Kendrick who doesn't give two [expletive] about money. He is somehow balancing fame with real rap. Something we haven't seen since the early 2000s

Lil B and all the other self proclaimed rappers are apart of Hip Hop. Somewhat of a darker side. It's been present in hip hop for a while. But the "real" [expletive] comes from people who rap for reasons

Edited by Ham, August 29, 2013 - 08:53 PM.

Mike D'Antoni is GARBAGE.


#8 BasketballIQ

BasketballIQ

    Superstar

  • 7,104 posts
  • Joined: Dec 29, 2012
  • Name:2 Jordans and 2 Steves
  • Fav. Laker:24

Posted August 29, 2013 - 09:35 PM

Can I ask this, how many of y'all are african american men from the hood. Not saying that a prerequisite to being a hip hop insider, but if we want to keep it real we know where this music was created.

 

 

After all that discussion, bc there were many people involved in the  contribution of hip hop as a culturtre. The dancers, te he artists, the DJ, the MC,and the crowd.

 

 

 

 

 

Hip hop didn't start with Rakim, it started as MC on the mic chanting phrases to rock the crowd, but because the disco scene that turned into East Coast hip hop eventually turned into the complex lyrical stylings you hear and have heard, people put that box on it.

 

 

Rapper's delight ain't hip-hop? Busy Bee ain't hip hop? Doug E Fresh is FAR from a lyricist, or Fat Boys or Biz Markie, but they are lyricist.

 

 

Fugees to Fat Joe to Uncle Luke, it's all hip hop as a culture and I love the rock and the comparisons to other genres.

 

I mean Mariah Carey is pop/r&b and so is Ciara, but they have very different voices and songs, same with hip hop.

 

 

if a bunch of people like to be in a club dancing to French montana or Gucci or whomever, it's not different than the more elitist rap fans listening to Evidence or Slaughterhouse or whomever.

 

 

As a dude in the hood, I love hood music.

 

And even as fake as Rick ross may or may not be, he still makes real music and dope hip hop



#9 Jee

Jee

    ♚ ROOKIE ©

  • 579 posts
  • Joined: Feb 06, 2013
  • Location:California
  • Name:Jee
  • Fan Since:1988
  • Fav. Laker:ANY WHO PLAYS HERE

Posted August 30, 2013 - 11:47 PM

Can I ask this, how many of y'all are african american men from the hood. Not saying that a prerequisite to being a hip hop insider, but if we want to keep it real we know where this music was created.

I'm not African American, but I had the pleasures of unfortunately growing up in gang infested areas due to financial limitations. Hood is hood though, does not matter the color of your skin it doesn't discriminate. You on point with everything you stated. Actually, everyone is correct on this topic. :clap2:

As a dude in the hood, I love hood music.

Yeah, I tend to listen to more gangster music, because I was around it and can relate to it, but I'm trying to shake that hood mentality before I end up in the grave or prison.

 

J Cole - But homie if you change, man you change for the better



#10 BasketballIQ

BasketballIQ

    Superstar

  • 7,104 posts
  • Joined: Dec 29, 2012
  • Name:2 Jordans and 2 Steves
  • Fav. Laker:24

Posted September 01, 2013 - 04:25 PM

Put it like this

 

 

We've seen A movie and B movie like Snoop Dogg Hood of Horrors or Tales from the Hood, or something like that.,

 

Both are cinematic films, even though they aren't Forrest Gump or whatever, just like a porn movie is still a movie.

 

 

 

Obviously someone like Nas is GREAT, but sometimes all people want to see is Terminator 2, they don'tewant Driving Miss Daisy






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users