Jump to content




Photo

We definitely should have signed Gerald Green


  • Please log in to reply
339 replies to this topic

#101 L.A.K.E.R

L.A.K.E.R

    Gomu Gomu

  • 14,823 posts
  • Joined: Jul 24, 2008
  • Location:California
  • Name:Shamim
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:07 AM

You make it sound as if Gerald Green is some established NBA veteran when he's really been a player that's floated around the league for years and in and out of the D-League. He's doing pretty well right now, but I don't trust him to become a legitimate contributor to a single team for multiple seasons. He's getting an opportunity on a lowly Nets team he would have never had here. Yes, he would have been the better signing instead of Kapono, but hindsight is 20/20. Jordan Farmar and Sasha Vujacic were also on the Nets in the past and both looked good for stretches, yet we all remember how ineffective the two of them were on the Lakers. Gerald Green would have been underutilized here and been a terrible fit because he needs the basketball and an excess of FGA to have any real impact.

On a team with Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum, he's not going to get the run at SG or the looks that he would on a team like the Nets. That alone would curb his impact tremendously. Also, I don't think it's fair to say that Ebanks will never be as good as Green. I mean, what exactly has Green done in his career? Aside from splurging on bad teams like the Celtics and the Nets, he's been bench fodder his entire career. He hasn't accomplished enough to garner any such praise.

Better signing than Kapono for sure, but I'm not losing any sleep over the Lakers missing out on Gerald Green.

#102 Cj2008nw

Cj2008nw

    Sixth Man

  • 3,119 posts
  • Joined: Dec 26, 2011
  • Fan Since:1999
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:20 AM

You make it sound as if Gerald Green is some established NBA veteran when he's really been a player that's floated around the league for years and in and out of the D-League. He's doing pretty well right now, but I don't trust him to become a legitimate contributor to a single team for multiple seasons. He's getting an opportunity on a lowly Nets team he would have never had here. Yes, he would have been the better signing instead of Kapono, but hindsight is 20/20. Jordan Farmar and Sasha Vujacic were also on the Nets in the past and both looked good for stretches, yet we all remember how ineffective the two of them were on the Lakers. Gerald Green would have been underutilized here and been a terrible fit because he needs the basketball and an excess of FGA to have any real impact.

On a team with Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum, he's not going to get the run at SG or the looks that he would on a team like the Nets. That alone would curb his impact tremendously. Also, I don't think it's fair to say that Ebanks will never be as good as Green. I mean, what exactly has Green done in his career? Aside from splurging on bad teams like the Celtics and the Nets, he's been bench fodder his entire career. He hasn't accomplished enough to garner any such praise.

Better signing than Kapono for sure, but I'm not losing any sleep over the Lakers missing out on Gerald Green.


Whoa u tripping I don't expect green to be what he is on the nets to the lakers lol but I just think he would give us size and at least contribute if we picked him up for a cheap contract our bench would have been
Sessions
Green
Barnes
Mcroberts
Hill

And if everybody is running that would have been a nice bench considering sessions can pass and score...

#103 L.A.K.E.R

L.A.K.E.R

    Gomu Gomu

  • 14,823 posts
  • Joined: Jul 24, 2008
  • Location:California
  • Name:Shamim
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:23 AM

Size yes, but basketball IQ? Nope. He'll be a bigger Shannon Brown with the same lack of defense, great hops, and streaky jumpshot. Better than Kapono, but not a major addition or anything.

#104 kobynum

kobynum

    Panic eliminator

  • 10,358 posts
  • Joined: Oct 19, 2008
  • Name:LA Pharaoh
  • Fan Since:In Los Angeles, LA fandom is a birthrite
  • Fav. Laker:Mamba and Magic

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:30 AM

He wouldn't get Kobe any more rest. Not a good fit
Again - this team, as currently constructed won't make it out of the second round of the playoffs, let alone the West or win the Finals.---fido on 2011 Lakers

#105 Cj2008nw

Cj2008nw

    Sixth Man

  • 3,119 posts
  • Joined: Dec 26, 2011
  • Fan Since:1999
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:35 AM

Size yes, but basketball IQ? Nope. He'll be a bigger Shannon Brown with the same lack of defense, great hops, and streaky jumpshot. Better than Kapono, but not a major addition or anything.


WHOA Shannon brown was actually a good defensive player lol i mean C'mon really.... Basketball I.Q.? And he should be able to guard shooting guards because of his length and athleticism...not saying he can but he should be able too.. Cause right now Andrew goudelock is the only back up we have at the 2 and he is bullied by bigger guards and can only spot up and hit shots.... After I seen him play a few games I didn't think much of him I think a lot of people exaggerate how good he is cause he can knock down open 3s and his decision making when he puts the ball on the floor is not good at. All

#106 kobynum

kobynum

    Panic eliminator

  • 10,358 posts
  • Joined: Oct 19, 2008
  • Name:LA Pharaoh
  • Fan Since:In Los Angeles, LA fandom is a birthrite
  • Fav. Laker:Mamba and Magic

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:38 AM

Goudelock makes okay decisions
Again - this team, as currently constructed won't make it out of the second round of the playoffs, let alone the West or win the Finals.---fido on 2011 Lakers

#107 L.A.K.E.R

L.A.K.E.R

    Gomu Gomu

  • 14,823 posts
  • Joined: Jul 24, 2008
  • Location:California
  • Name:Shamim
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:45 AM

WHOA Shannon brown was actually a good defensive player lol i mean C'mon really.... Basketball I.Q.? And he should be able to guard shooting guards because of his length and athleticism...not saying he can but he should be able too.. Cause right now Andrew goudelock is the only back up we have at the 2 and he is bullied by bigger guards and can only spot up and hit shots.... After I seen him play a few games I didn't think much of him I think a lot of people exaggerate how good he is cause he can knock down open 3s and his decision making when he puts the ball on the floor is not good at. All


Yes, basketball IQ. It's common sense to not leave knockdown three-point shooters open and to attack the basket if you have a definite advantage with speed and athleticism. Shannon Brown was almost always late on his defensive rotations (remember Ray Allen's Game 2 performance in 2010?), had a penchant for throwing up long contested mid-range jumpers, and hardly ever attacked the basket. He was terrible defensively, he only ever played half decent against Deron Williams and Chauncey Billups, two guards he could body up with, but was burnt by seemingly every other matchup. Defensive rotations were especially terrible, I can't count the number of times I remember seeing a guy wide open and Shannon have to sprint back from inside the paint on a closeout that did nothing.

Once Shannon began to jack up shots as the primary back-up SG off the bench, the rest of his game quickly deteriorated.

Goudelock isn't an answer for our bench woes, but he's as serviceable as you'll find from a 2nd round rookie. I'm not expecting much from him, but the fact that he can actually contribute anything is great.

#108 lodom7

lodom7

    Rookie

  • 928 posts
  • Joined: Apr 10, 2011
  • Location:dena
  • Name:Matt
  • Fan Since:Kid
  • Fav. Laker:Lamar Odom

Posted March 18, 2012 - 11:24 AM

rather have goudelock play and develop into a jason terry type player
Posted Image

Lamar Odom 2005-2011

#109 CoinFlip

CoinFlip

    Rookie

  • 47 posts
  • Joined: Mar 14, 2012

Posted March 18, 2012 - 01:46 PM

Hey, L.A.K.E.R.

Earlier in this thread, I had a conversation with another site administrator, Real Deal, pretty much explaining my pov. His pov is the same as yours, as I am sure you are aware. So, if you read through that and then commented here then I think you are misreading why I or anyone else might care about Green.

You make it sound as if Gerald Green is some established NBA veteran when he's really been a player that's floated around the league for years and in and out of the D-League.


He's doing pretty well right now, but I don't trust him to become a legitimate contributor to a single team for multiple seasons.


Also, I don't think it's fair to say that Ebanks will never be as good as Green. I mean, what exactly has Green done in his career? Aside from splurging on bad teams like the Celtics and the Nets, he's been bench fodder his entire career. He hasn't accomplished enough to garner any such praise.


Yes, he would have been the better signing instead of Kapono, but hindsight is 20/20. Jordan Farmar and Sasha Vujacic were also on the Nets in the past and both looked good for stretches, yet we all remember how ineffective the two of them were on the Lakers.


Better signing than Kapono for sure, but I'm not losing any sleep over the Lakers missing out on Gerald Green.


Ok, these are valid points, but I do not think they are good points. No one is saying that Green has done anything of import in the league and you shouldn't say that that is what advocates for Green in this thread have been implying. Any support on his behalf is based on a judgment of his future worth and not a defense of his past. You are correct: the fact is indisputable that he has already burned through a major chunk of his athletic prime years without having accomplished anything.

So, why do I care? And why should you? The crux of the disagreements in this thread revolves around two very different views of his future worth, I must assume. The readers in this thread who would like Gerald Green in P&G place a high value on his future worth. You, Real Deal, and many others mark his value much lower. Simply by comparing Gerald Green to Jordan Farmar, Sasha Vujacic, and Devin Ebanks and mention of a comfy sleep pretty much proves that you see only marginal value in him as an NBA basketball player, now and forever.

And since I cannot call upon Gerald Green to prove his worth to his doubters simply by waving his pathetically thin resume, I suppose I can defend him only by defending my own judgment...to you. So here sincerely is my personal reason why I think Gerald Green should have been signed by the Lakers.

First, let me list what is incontrovertible.
1. His body is within the range of what is considered ideal size and type for a wing player.
2. He has elite-of-elites level of athleticism, coordination, body control, leaping ability.
3. He has good strength for a wing player.
4. He is fast and agile.
5. He has good hand size and hand strength.
...
6. I could keep listing his physical attributes that make him an ideal prospect, but I think you will at least grant that this is all true about him--that he has a set of ideal physical tools to potentially excel in this game which is different from the physical tools available to a Sasha Vujacic or a Jordan Farmar.

But what of Devin Ebanks? I have stated my doubt that he could turn out to be as good as Green. Yet, he seems to have physical tools that are not too unlike Green's.

To answer this I must first admit that nobody knows the future. I do not know with certainty who will ultimately turn out to be the better player. My confidence is based on nothing more than a hunch I have formed by weighing probabilities based on historic patterns which I have observed. Actually, to call these things "patterns" is not quite being honest. In actuality, it is not something scientifically substantiated; this is just what I think I have been seeing these last two decades I have been a lay NBA fan. But I will call them patterns for a lack of a better word. There are many patterns but here are the ones that I find relevant to an evaluation of Gerald Green.

1. All things being equal, young athletic wings who demonstrate skill in dribbling, shooting, and scoring off go-to moves are likely to be more successful in the league than young athletic wings who fail to demonstrate an ability in one or more of these skills.

For instance, in the history of the league (as I imagine it to be), there is a strong tendency for a shooter or even a scorer who is not competent at dribbling at age 22 to fail to become a great dribbler later in his career. But a young man who shows he can dribble competently through traffic at a young age is more likely to become an expert dribbler in the league.

2. A young wing with freak athletic talents and a certain type of body type, coordination, flexibility, and body control, who can dribble competently as a young man, but who cannot shoot or score off go-to-moves can eventually become an expert in all three. My belief is that such a wing who works to master dribbling skills is in fact a dedicated professional who wants to become an NBA scorer.

3a. A young man with elite level of athleticism who eventually demonstrates good ability in dribbling, shooting, and scoring off go-to-moves has the ability to master all three skills.

3b. An NBA wing who masters these three skills is a superstar.

Gerald Green is a still young wing with elite athleticism who can dribble, shoot, and score off studied moves that are of high-degree of difficulty. But he has not yet mastered any of these three nor tested them enough against game planned NBA defenses. Nevertheless, according to my patterns, if he worked hard to improve his body and skillset, he will become a superstar.

This is the lens through which I see Gerald Green. It does not mean he will become a superstar; his success is contingent on his working on his game. But at this point, I feel it is true that if he works to improve and expand his game, he will become a superstar. The only thing stopping him is work and experience. His potential right now is enormous compared to Ebanks's. According to my pattern, Devin Ebanks has shown that he might become a good shooter, but it is uncertain as of now whether he will become a good dribbler or someone who can score off complex skilled moves.

Because of my prejudices based on my sense of the patterns of skill development in the NBA, I am thinking that we would be fortunate if Ebanks turned out to be as good as Trevor Ariza--that is, someone who is not an expert dribbler or scorer off difficult moves but who can shoot it sometimes.

Although I am expressing my doubt, I do acknowledge that I am in fact being very unfair to Ebanks. I do not know his level of determination so I do not know how he will improve his game. But my feeling is that he will not become a competent enough dribbler and learn either scoring skills or guard skills to become more than a role player. This is because I do not think he has the right kind of coordination to become an expert dribbler, which I think is a prerequisite for Ebanks to become something more. But the first indication that will tell me that I am wrong will be when he comes to camp one fall with mad dribbling skills. If that were to happen, then I would immediately change my mind about him. But for now, my sense of him is that he will not develop into much of anything.

As for Green, I am not at all saying that I can guarantee that Green will indeed turn out to be a superstar. What I am saying is that I think he will become a superstar because I think the probability is high that he could be. And at the least, I do not think he will be just some minor role player. I just do not see any journeyman wing player his size in the NBA who moves like him and is developing the skills he is developing.

The majority of the doubts surrounding him is based on the fact of scarcity of accomplishments up to now. After all, if he has all this ability and potential, why hasn't he done anything. You, Real Deal, and many others in the greater NBA fandom say this very thing.

To this, I would appeal to a uniqueness of his life circumstance, which is that he got himself de facto self-banished from the league for several years. By pissing off management in a number of organizations with his awful attitude before his arrival in LA, he lost himself valuable experience and training time. And it was his own fault. And when he then petulantly stormed off to Russia and then to China for a few years, he further forfeited valuable NBA experience. But his experiences there seems to have taught him humility and the value of professionalism. None of this denies his superstar potential. The same potential, which everyone saw in 2005, still exists. the difference is, now, that potential appears to reside in a mind ready to grow up and become a professional to be coached.

But now he dribbles a bit better than when he left. And he has added a high percentage outside shooting ability capable of hitting at mid range and from three. And he has developed actual scoring moves, like the turn around fade, the step back, the floater, the running hook, the post up and back down, the pull up jumper, and I am sure many more. I just do not understand how anyone who sees such array of skills in such an athlete can maintain that this individual will necessarily amount to nothing more than a marginal player. At least give me some examples of people who fit Green's description who ended up merely being bench warmers. And do not offer Vujacic, Ebanks, or Farmar as examples after watching Green perform difficult skilled moves while shooting better than 50% from the field. I just don't understand that attitude. How could anyone compare Green with his size and athleticism and scoring skills and the ability to maneuver himself into his favored scoring spots to Sasha, who is not a freakish athlete, does not have freakish body dimensions, can't really dribble, shoot, score off complex moves, or maneuver himself for an easy shot. You cannot be serious.


On a team with Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum, he's not going to get the run at SG or the looks that he would on a team like the Nets. That alone would curb his impact tremendously.


Green is huge. At 6'8" and long, you can stick him at 3 where he has often played. Right now, he is backing up Gerald Wallace at 3 and MarShon Brooks at 2 as part of a scoring rotation at wing. Gerald Green would have outright seized the starting 3 role for the Lakers.


He's getting an opportunity on a lowly Nets team he would have never had here.


Gerald Green would have been underutilized here and been a terrible fit because he needs the basketball and an excess of FGA to have any real impact.


I find this assertion unlikely for the reasons I gave above.

But ah, the point seems moot. Moot.

#110 CoinFlip

CoinFlip

    Rookie

  • 47 posts
  • Joined: Mar 14, 2012

Posted March 18, 2012 - 01:47 PM

The comment about Green having low IQ is demonstrably wrong. These commenters are not actually watching him play. Nobody in New Jersey thinks he is a stupid player. This is a ridiculous assertion.

Edited by CoinFlip, March 18, 2012 - 01:48 PM.


#111 CoinFlip

CoinFlip

    Rookie

  • 47 posts
  • Joined: Mar 14, 2012

Posted March 18, 2012 - 01:55 PM

The main gripe for me about Green is his rebounding stat; it is way too low. But as for his defensive rotations, I see him doing his part and his best on an awful defensive team. My feeling is that he would have excelled for us.<<--EDIT: I mean he seems to be coachable and amenable to instruction.

Edited by CoinFlip, March 18, 2012 - 02:27 PM.


#112 CoinFlip

CoinFlip

    Rookie

  • 47 posts
  • Joined: Mar 14, 2012

Posted March 18, 2012 - 02:18 PM

ok, nevermind about the rebounding, it's good for the minutes he plays...

#113 L.A.K.E.R

L.A.K.E.R

    Gomu Gomu

  • 14,823 posts
  • Joined: Jul 24, 2008
  • Location:California
  • Name:Shamim
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 02:52 PM

The comments about Gerald Green's basketball IQ are based upon his total production throughout his entire NBA career, and I'm not about change my assertion based upon his play through 11 games for a lottery bound Nets squad. He has proven himself a chucker in the past with amazing athleticism but an inability to play alongside other ball dominant players. He hasn't been able to stick with a team because he hasn't bought into any offensive system on an established team. Mavericks fans were raving about him when he joined their squad in the '08-09 season, glad that they finally had a slasher perimeter guard on the team with all the physical tools and necessary talent. He became wildly inconsistent and was disinterested in creating for anyone other than himself. He had started a handful of games early in the season but eventually fell out of the rotation and was not brought back.

Just how limited is Gerald Green's ability to create for others? Through 192 career games, he has accumulated a total of 152 assists. That's not even one assists a game. On the Nets thus far it's been more of the same with him dishing 7 assists in 11 games. He's also shooting 52% which is well above his career average and I don't believe he'll keep it up.

When a healthy Brook Lopez and Deron Williams are in the picture, you'll see Gerald Green become far less efficient and putting up meager numbers because he won't have the opportunity to freewheel on offense and do whatever he wants. With fewer touches and two players that demand the ball be run through them, his efficiency and general usefulness for the Nets will take a hit. On the Nets he can have as many FGA as he can handle and be as selfish as he wants when he has the ball because that team is going nowhere. On our team, however, we can't accommodate that with Kobe Bryant, Andrew Bynum, and Pau Gasol eating up the majority of touches on the offensive end.

Would he have been a better addition than Kapono? Probably. Would he have been a major contributor and gamechanger for us? I highly doubt that. Before labeling Gerald Green as another one that got away from the Lakers, I need to see more consistent production from him over an extended period on a legitimate team in the NBA.

Right now, he seems like the same Gerald Green to me: an amazingly athletic player, but very limited in his actual basketball ability. He has all the tools and can thrive if he puts in the work, but his game is still very limited as primarily an offensive finisher who does little else on the floor.

#114 CoinFlip

CoinFlip

    Rookie

  • 47 posts
  • Joined: Mar 14, 2012

Posted March 18, 2012 - 03:22 PM

Right now, he seems like the same Gerald Green to me: an amazingly athletic player, but very limited in his actual basketball ability. He has all the tools and can thrive if he puts in the work, but his game is still very limited as primarily an offensive finisher who does little else on the floor.


What do you mean by "finisher?" I would normally take that to mean someone like a Tyson Chandler who gets assisted for dunks. If that is what you mean, then you are simply in error.

But thanks for sharing with me how you go about evaluating talent. But, your methodology seems fallacious to me because you have a big hole in your data that cannot fairly be filled, which is that the dude has been out of the league for a few years and has not played a full NBA season since 2007, which is the only season in which he did play a full season. If you wanted to be have a better sense of how he might perform, you ought to at least consider his NBDL performance. But obviously it's tough to mix stats from different leagues. Nevertheless, to say that you can definitively know who Green is by perusing nothing more than his NBA career stats would be like getting a visit from your son who is visiting for the first time since getting his BA from a far away university and you saying that you can authoritatively gauge his current level of basketball skills because you played against him when he was in high school.

Ok, I get it that you are either not watching his games or his highlights or that you are and you still think it is all a fluke.

If this is the only way the Lakers management make their personnel decisions--in other words, if they don't really care what kind of skills a prospect has already learned when grading talent and only looked at stats that may not have any relevance to future performance--then I would be disappointed in them.

Edited by CoinFlip, March 18, 2012 - 04:07 PM.


#115    

   

  • 40,432 posts
  • Joined: Aug 26, 2010

Posted March 18, 2012 - 04:07 PM

rather have goudelock play and develop into a jason terry type player

He doesn't have anything close to Terry's handles nor speed/quickness AND he can't create his own shot AS easily as Terry.

yo.


#116 L.A.K.E.R

L.A.K.E.R

    Gomu Gomu

  • 14,823 posts
  • Joined: Jul 24, 2008
  • Location:California
  • Name:Shamim
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 04:18 PM

By finisher I mean someone who doesn't create for others on offense and their sole job on the offensive end is to score or "finish". That's exactly what Gerald Green does. He's not a playmaker or facilitator based upon his limited ability to create for others, and he scores solely off of isolation plays or from being set up for a wide open jumper. I haven't watched too many Nets games, but the bits and pieces I have seen have not really impressed me that much. I've seen Gerald Green play through different stages of his NBA career and he has not really impressed me given his physical talents.

Fallacious? If the guy can't stay on an NBA team, I'm not sure how else to evaluate his overall play. That obviously means that something is wrong, either with his attitude or skills. He's looked good for the Nets during this 11 game stretch, but as RD pointed out a few pages back, he wasn't exactly facing elite competition. Again, I need to see him put up consistent numbers for a longer period of time before considering him as a legitimate player that the Lakers missed out on.

I'm not putting much stock into the NBDL because the level of talent in that league is so ridiculously low compared to the NBA that I don't believe it's a legitimate measuring tool for a player. Gerald Green apparently looked great in the D-League which is why he even got a call-up to the Nets. I took a look at the stats and see that he played 22 games averaging 19 ppg on 48% shooting and around 46% from beyond the arc. Great numbers, but it's the D-League. I might as well look at his peers who have also played some time in the NBA in the last two seasons.

Scouring the list of players in the 2011-12 season, I see Devin Ebanks averaged 18 ppg on 55% shooting and 50% from beyond the arc. Yi Jianlian averaged 23 ppg on 47% shooting, last season Trey Johnson averaged 26 ppg on 50% shooting, and even Joe Alexander averaged 20 ppg on 50% shooting. Terrence Williams in the 2010-11 season put up 28/11/11 in the D-League.

None of these guys are rotational players in the NBA nor contributing members of their respective teams. I believe three of them aren't even on NBA rosters.

Highlights are the absolutely last thing I would EVER consider when gauging a players ability. Anyone can look great on a highlight reel, doesn't impress me one bit.

A team looks at how a player would fit into the current scheme of a team. Gerald Green would be used primarily as a spot-up shooter on this team with Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum dominating the touches. There is no way that he gets as many shot attempts as he's had on the Nets with the likes of Brook Lopez and Deron Williams missing multiple games. Again, he would have been a better pickup than Jason Kapono, but he's not some hidden gem that they've let slip away. Unless he really blossoms or explodes ala Jeremy Lin, I'm not really bothered by the fact that he was passed on by the Lakers.

#117 Majesty

Majesty

    Grats on making the Raiderettes cuzzo!!

  • 38,604 posts
  • Joined: Dec 11, 2011
  • Name:Jay
  • Fan Since:1987
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe present, Magic past

Posted March 18, 2012 - 04:52 PM

You shouldn't discredit NBDL play. When you see a player improve their skills and become better players down there its because they work hard to do so. Some people go to the NBDL and still suck. You shouldn't discredit the leaps and bounds in maturity and their game of players that go to the NBDL and become better players just cause it's the NBDL. Its where players go to DEVELOP, hence the name. So not putting much 'stock' in the improvements made in the NBDL makes the argument weaker.

Is Wayne Brady gonna have to Djokovic? - Robert Flores 


#118 L.A.K.E.R

L.A.K.E.R

    Gomu Gomu

  • 14,823 posts
  • Joined: Jul 24, 2008
  • Location:California
  • Name:Shamim
  • Fan Since:2000
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe Bryant

Posted March 18, 2012 - 05:06 PM

I've pointed out the numbers that marginal NBA talent have put up in the NBDL, and I'm merely stating that I don't put much stock into the statistics or how good a players looks in that league. Lesser competition can make anyone look good, kind of like how HS players will look downright unstoppable at a pick-up game at the park. For NBDL players, the real proof of their ability is how they play in the NBA, against the best talent. A guy who is a half decent bench player in the NBA can play against lesser talent and look like a superstar in the NBDL. Development is great for young players that are still very raw in their overall abilities or new to the league, but I'm simply not impressed by a guy who was drafted in 2005 finally making it onto an NBA roster and contributing something.

#119 Real Deal

Real Deal

    Legend

  • 14,877 posts
  • Joined: Jun 29, 2008
  • Location:Kansas
  • Name:Brandon
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe

Posted March 18, 2012 - 08:25 PM

Stick Gerald Green at the three, and watch him get absolutely destroyed against Kevin Durant in the playoffs. No thanks. We have had two major holes on this team: the one and three. We filled the one with a PG that can create and get to the rim, and one that won't get lit up on the defensive end. If we're going to do something about the three, we better make sure we can still rely on our three to play defense.

Beasley would have played a lot of four, with us going small. Green can't step up and play the four, and the two best teams in the NBA (in our path to a championship) fill the three with their two best players, Durant and LeBron. Green would get little play at that position, in a situation where we would meet either of those teams, and when the dust clears, the Lakers only care about a championship, and that's why we build a roster.

#120 Majesty

Majesty

    Grats on making the Raiderettes cuzzo!!

  • 38,604 posts
  • Joined: Dec 11, 2011
  • Name:Jay
  • Fan Since:1987
  • Fav. Laker:Kobe present, Magic past

Posted March 18, 2012 - 10:54 PM

Stick Gerald Green at the three, and watch him get absolutely destroyed against Kevin Durant in the playoffs. No thanks. We have had two major holes on this team: the one and three. We filled the one with a PG that can create and get to the rim, and one that won't get lit up on the defensive end. If we're going to do something about the three, we better make sure we can still rely on our three to play defense.

Beasley would have played a lot of four, with us going small. Green can't step up and play the four, and the two best teams in the NBA (in our path to a championship) fill the three with their two best players, Durant and LeBron. Green would get little play at that position, in a situation where we would meet either of those teams, and when the dust clears, the Lakers only care about a championship, and that's why we build a roster.



because Green would obviously be the starting 3 guarding Durant over Green right? Can't be much worse than Barnes whom even when he plays good defense on him fouls him. There is also no guarantee that either Miami or the Thunder would make it against us or vice versa, and we can run different defensive lineups depending on what team we're facing. We've done it before and could do it again. Having Green doesn't mean that we wouldn't have Artest, or even Barnes on Durant or run a lineup against it. If anything Green would be defending their bench players. So it's not set in stone what exactly we'd do when matched up against said teams.

Is Wayne Brady gonna have to Djokovic? - Robert Flores 





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users