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Adding .srt subtitles to a .mp4 video???


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#1 Sako32

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Posted December 22, 2009 - 01:13 AM

I want to do it without losing any quality from the video. How do i do it???

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#2 daco_inc

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Posted December 27, 2009 - 09:47 AM

If you want to hardsub it directly into the mp4 file, then it's impossible to do it without losing quality. You can't hardsub without re-encoding (and with re-encoding comes quality loss). To hardsub it, there's virtualdubmod and avisynth. Just google something like "hardsub mp4" and you should find some site that will walk you through the process. I haven't done it in a while, but there might be even easier ways because vdubmod and avisynth is a [expletive] to work with. Google is your friend.

Another way to do it is to use a container format, like mkv, that will basically combine the mp4 and srt into one file, but still keeps them separate so that there is no loss of quality.

#3 GCMD

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Posted April 29, 2010 - 11:47 AM

On a mac, I use ffmpegx or submerge. For .mkv, there is an app call MKVTools. It takes the audio, video and subs form MKVs and puts them in separate files. It also re-encodes to mp4 or avi formats. It can hardsub when it re-encodes also.


There is literally no way to hardsub without re-encoding...it's the very definition of re-encoding because it is integrate new video over the main video layer. Sorry.


If you don't want to re-encode, I suggest placing everything in the MKV container/format. That's your best bet.


Also, ffmpegx gives you an option of 3-pass encoding which can get you to near original quality. It also offers a host of other options like deblocking, de-interlace, denoise,...et cetera.

Good luck and I'm sorry that I couldn't be more helpful.

#4 cookisey

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Posted January 02, 2015 - 03:53 AM

From an article on how to add SRT to MP4, I learn that:

 

There are many kinds of subtitle formats: SRT, ASS, SSA, IDX, and SUB, etc today. One of the most widely used formats for subtitles is SRT (SubRip), which is supported by most video players, subtitle editing tools and some hardware home media players. Even YouTube supports .srt files.

 

SSA (Sub Station Alpha), is a subtitle format used by the famous subtitle editor, SubStation Alpha. It has an enormous amount of options including Karaoke, audio effects, graphic drawing etc. ASS, similar to SSA, is another popular subtitle format.

 

SubViewer (.sub) files are the native subtitle format of the SubViewer utility. SUB file usually comes from DVD subtitle, which contains subtitle images. Where there is a SUB file, there must be an IDX file. IDX file is a text file which specify which image in SUB file should be showed at specific time. SubViewer became popular when support for it was included in the DivX media player. On August 28 2008, YouTube included support for SubViewer and SubRip, allowing existing videos to be retroactively subtitled.






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